Google Search? Not As Much As You Would Think

On my daily travels through Mashable this evening I came across this rather fascinating story about how Google is killing organic search; and how only roughly 13% of the results page is actually dedicated to giving you the results you need.

The story references a study done by Aaron Harris (twitter: @harris), the founder of Tutorspree, who broke down the Google organic results page(s) and found that far less “real estate” is used to provide you with search results than you would think, or expect.

Google has been the “king” of Internet Search for quite some time, so much so that we no longer say we’ll “search” for something, we often just say “Google-it”.  However the days of copious lists of results seem to have been replaced gradually by revenue raising Google advertising, and with the localised search data we now have other Google products such as Maps also taking up seemingly valuable website space.

Harris used “Auto Mechanic” as an example, while logged into Google on a machine in the TriBeCa area.

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Says Harris, “I’m using a Macbook Air 13inch. My browser size is set to “Actual Size.” The rest of the page is taken up by Google products. Adwords take up 29% of the page. Google’s map, plotted with it’s own local results takes up 7% of the page. Google’s navigation bar, complete with notifications for my Google+ account, takes up 14% of the page.”

The results themselves?  Harris continues, saying, “The top organic result? Wikipedia. The next two? Yelp, a competitor against which Google is clearly moving.(2)”

If you think 13% is bad, it gets worse – far worse.  “Italian food” provided just 7% real estate dedicated to the organic search results, and if you used your mobile phone, the answer was as low as 0%.  That’s right, NOTHING.

I strongly suggest taking a few minutes to read the study by Aaron Harris on Tutorspree.  You’ll be truly amazed at how little Google is actually providing us by way of Organic Search data.

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